Training

The Biological Clocks Training Program (BCTP) is designed to provide predoctoral students with:

  • a general knowledge of circadian rhythms at the behavioral, physiological and anatomical levels;
  • a comprehensive knowledge of how the circadian clock functions at the molecular and biochemical levels in different organisms;
  • opportunities to develop their oral and written presentation skills; and
  • exposure to eminent circadian clock researchers who share their goals and interests.

Research Training: BCTP students are admitted through several departments and programs on campus including the Department of Biology, the Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, the Faculty of Genetics, and the Texas A&M Institute for Neuroscience. Incoming doctoral students perform rotations through at least two laboratories prior to selecting a lab home for dissertation research. The number and duration of rotations, and sources of support, are tailored to individual students. Interactions among the CBCR labs encourage multidisciplinary approaches in research design.

Coursework: All BCTP doctoral students enroll in a course on Biological Clocks (BIOL 601). This graduate level course covers the formal properties of the circadian clock, as well as in depth studies of the clocks in major model organisms and humans that incorporates classical and current literature. Students present papers from the literature and develop a testable hypothesis. From this hypothesis, students write a grant proposal for their final exam. The Biological Clocks course is taught during the spring semester every two years.

All trainees (and other members of CBCR laboratories) participate year-round in the Clocks Journal Club (CJC), attended by faculty, postdocs, and students from the participating labs. Presentations include journal article reviews and research talks.

The remainder of coursework is customized for each student in consultation with his or her graduate advisory committee to be compatible with the program requirements for the chosen Ph.D. emphasis.

Interaction with the Biological Clocks Community: Trainees will participate in our annual regional biological rhythms research meeting (SECTS for Clocks), and have the opportunity to attend international circadian rhythms meetings such as the Gordon Research Conference on Chronobiology and the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms (SRBR) conference.

Interested in predoctoral or postdoctoral training within the CBCR? Contact us and tell us of your interests, background, and what level of training you seek.

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Faculty

Gregg C. Allen

Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics, TAM Health Science Center

Deb Bell-Pedersen

Biology

David Earnest

Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics, TAM Health Science Center

Richard Gomer

Biology

Paul Hardin

Biology

Gladys Ko

Veterinary Integrative Biosciences

Jerome Menet

Biology

Christine Merlin

Biology

Weston Porter

Veterinary Integrative Biosciences

Terry Thomas

Biology

Gerard Toussaint

Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics, TAM Health Science Center

Chaodong Wu

Nutrition and Food Science

Mark Zoran

Biology